Did you know that May is National Osteoporosis Awareness and Prevention Month? Osteoporosis is one of the most common bone diseases. It causes an individual's bones to become brittle and fragile, which can lead to osteoporotic fractures. These fractures are most common in the spine, wrist, and hip regions of the body. This is a metabolic bone disease that is a result of bone resorption not being compensated by bone formation, resulting in fragile bones. Essentially, bone resorption is when osteoclasts break down tissues in the bone to release minerals into the bloodstream. An equal deposition of new minerals balances this gradual removal of bone minerals so strength can be maintained. When the balance leans toward excessive resorption, the bones become extremely weak. Osteoporosis affects over 75 million people over the age of 50 in the US, Europe, and Japan, with most cases being women, but over 2 million cases in the US being men. Another statistic, 1 in 3 women and 1 in 5 men over the age of 50 are diagnosed with osteoporosis.

It is difficult to detect osteoporosis early, but medical professionals may be able to identify certain signs. Many of these signs stem from the bones themselves, such as loss of bone strength, serious bone loss, and bone mineral density. Some other ways that medical professionals can catch osteoporosis early are by using diagnostic biomarkers. These include:

  •  DXA scans, 25-OH Vitamin D, Collagen Type 1 CTx in the blood, Amino-terminal P1NP in the blood, Collagen cross-linked NTx in the urine, Pyrlinks-D in the urine, and Genomic healthy profiles. 

There are risk factors that are easily influenced by diet and lifestyle changes. Certain lifestyle changes include:

  • Alcohol use
  • Smoking
  • Low body mass index
  • Vitamin D deficiency
  • Eating disorders
  • Insufficient exercise 
  • Low calcium intake
  • Frequent falls

Both of the risk factors are aided by certain vitamins and minerals needed by the body to strengthen the bones. Although these vitamins and minerals will aid in osteoporosis prevention, other changes will need to be made. Such as lessening alcohol and tobacco use, exercising more, and eating foods that are beneficial to your health. These changes need to be made even if they are small, because they will better your bodily health, and reduce the risk of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. Some easy lifestyle changes to start implementing into your daily or weekly routine are:

  • Weight-bearing exercises, reduction in alcohol use, smoking cessation, optimal vitamin D status (through safe sun exposure), and maintenance of a healthy body weight.

A healthy diet should consist of omega-3 fatty acids, polyphenols, and antioxidant-rich foods. You should strive to reduce your intake of dietary sugars, refined carbohydrates, and omega-6 fats. These compounds can produce large amounts of inflammatory cytokines. Another component of a healthy diet is proper calcium, magnesium, and protein intake.

  • Calcium: 1,000 - 1,300 mg/day based on age and gender
    • You can get calcium from yogurt, sardines, cheese, salmon, turnip greens, and kale
  • Magnesium: 310 - 420 mg/day based on age and gender
    • You can get magnesium from kale, spinach, swiss chard, pumpkin seeds, almonds, cashews, black beans, and dark chocolate
  • Protein: 0.8g per kilogram of body weight
    • You can get protein from grass-fed beef, bison, chicken, turkey, lamb, fish, shellfish, beans, legumes, nuts, and seeds.
  • Vitamin D: around 15 mcg daily
    • You can get vitamin D in your diet from liver, salmon, mackerel, sardines, tuna, eggs, and fish oil
    • You can also get Vitamin D from midday sun exposure

Studies have shown that people who have these necessary Calcium and Vitamin D levels demonstrate a 16% reduced fracture risk. Another study focused heavily on Magnesium intake showed a 40% reduced fracture risk. Therefore, these are some of the most beneficial vitamins and minerals for osteoporosis prevention. If you are unable to get a healthy dose of calcium, magnesium, protein, or Vitamin D certain supplements can help you reach the necessary amount. You can get these supplements here.

  • Osteobon - 2 capsules per day for 12 weeks
    • This supplement helps to maintain a healthy bone mineral density. This is high in calcium, magnesium, zinc, and vitamin D.
  • Vitamin D Supreme - 1-2 capsules per day for 12 weeks
    • This supplement provides useful doses of Vitamin D3, vitamin K (K1 and K2). and geranylgeraniol (GG) to promote optimal bone and arterial health, while also keeping the immune system in balance.
  • Annatto-E 300 - 1 capsule per day for 12 weeks
    • This supplement supports strong and healthy bones by utilizing tocotrienols sourced from annatto trees.
  • Whole Body Collagen -  one scoop per day for 12 weeks 
    • This supplement helps with bone strength and joint health.
  • Magnesium Glycinate Complex 1-2 capsules per day for 12 weeks
    • This supplement provides healthy amounts of magnesium to relax muscles and stimulate bone health.

Osteoporosis can be prevented by altering your lifestyle and being open to change. Make sure you are getting your necessary amounts of calcium, magnesium, protein, and vitamin D daily, while also engaging in physical activities to strengthen your body. These changes can be gradual, but they should happen so you can become the happiest and healthiest version of yourself! Click here to view the supplement protocol.

References:

1. Bone biology. International Osteoporosis Foundation. Accessed February 14, 2024. https://www.osteoporosis.foundation/health‑professionals/about‑osteoporosis/bone‑biology 

2. Kanis JA, Johnell O, Odén A, et al. Ten-year probabilities of osteoporotic fractures according to BMD and diagnosis thresholds. Osteoporosis Int. 2001;12:989‑995. doi:10.1007/s001980170006 

3. Kanis JA, Johansson H, Odén A, et al. A family history of fracture and fracture risk: a meta‑analysis. Bone. 2004;35:1029‑1037. doi:10.1016/j.bone.2004.06.017

 4. Kanis JA, De Laet C, Delmas P, et al. A meta‑analysis of previous fracture and fracture risk. Bone. 2004;35;375‑382. doi:10.1016/j.bone.2004.03.024 

5. Kanis J A, Johansson H, Odén A, et al. A meta‑analysis of prior corticosteroid use and fracture risk. J Bon Miner Res. 2004;19.893‑899. doi: 10.1359/JBMR.040134 

6. Kanis JA. Johansson H, Johnell O, et al. Alcohol intake as a risk factor for fracture. Osteoporosis Int. 2005;16:737‑742. doi:10.1007/s00198‑004‑1734‑y 

7. Kanis JA, Johnell O, Odén A, et al. Smoking and fracture risk: a meta‑analysis. Osteoporosis Int. 2005;16:155‑162. doi:10.1007/s00198‑004‑1640‑3 

8. Holick MF, Binkley NC, Bischoff‑Ferrari HA, et al. Evaluation, treatment, and prevention of vitamin D deficiency: an Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011;96(7):1911‑1930. doi.org/10.1210/jc.2011‑0385 

9. Heaney RP, Holick MF. Why the IOM recommendations for vitamin D are deficient. J Bone Min Res. 2011;26(3):455‑457. doi:10.1002/jbmr.328 

10. Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D. Food and Nutrition Board; National Institutes of Health. The National Academies Press, 2011. https://nap.nationalacademies.org/catalog/13050/ dietary‑reference‑intakes‑for‑calcium‑and‑vitamin‑d

 11. Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Fluoride. Food and Nutrition Board; National Institutes of Health. The National Academies Press, 1997. https://doi.org/10.17226/5776 

12. Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids. Food and Nutrition Board; National Institutes of Health. The National Academies Press; 2005. https://doi.org/10.17226/10490

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